Math for the End of the World (Part I): Rising Seas, Hope, and Math Education

…or, Eschatonimatics? Apocalyptic Curves? Oh these are truly terrible. When I last wrote about the PBL method of teaching math, I said that I often thought of this approach as Peoples’ Math (for it’s non-hierarchical structure emphasizing co-creation) and as Not Knowing Math (for it’s emphasis on students producing, rather than absorbing rotely, the math — […]

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On religion in the news, the Republican debate, and reading ‘Fun Home’ at Duke

I will write about religion in the news. There are two good reasons to do this: The way some religious people make news misrepresents what it looks like to do something with one’s religion. In America, this often takes the form of conservative Christians weaponizing this-or-that aspect of their faith to gain political leverage, at the expense of some marginalized group. It […]

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On a secular theology

Much of what I write on this blog will be notes toward a secular theology. The fact that I write as a “Theological Engineer” might already suggest that my theology will be grounded with a scientific and therefore secular worldview. I don’t see it that way. From engineering and the STEM worldview I gather intellectual tools: systems, […]

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